Im gonna go ahead and just build a therapy robot that rolls up and plays smooth jams when I need it.

Im gonna go ahead and just build a therapy robot that rolls up and plays smooth jams when I need it.

felixsalmon:

This picture has been doing the rounds, and it’s certainly an interesting explanation of the Economist’s house style. I particularly like the idea of a red rectangle as a way of keeping the chart identified as coming from the Economist, even when it moves onto Twitter, Tumblr, etc. But, why on earth would you want to “move the chart as far into the background as possible”? There’s an inferiority complex, here, with respect to “the surrounding article”, which is unhealthy.
Most interesting, however, is the squib at the bottom, saying that the chart “has been created for educational purposes only” and “has not been created by The Economist”. Which means that this chart shows what a *designer* thinks an Economist chart should look like. As opposed to a data visualization professional, who understands numbers and how to convey information using charts. Read More…

… and a “warm welcome”? You have approx 3 seconds to suck me in. There’s no time for cuddling in visualizing data. 
Engineer & applied physicists, Jean-luc Doumon, spinning in his grave. Just kidding, he’s alive and well, selling a fantastic (necessary/expensive) book for anyone interested in visualizing & communicating data…or, for those of us who are punished by eyesore presentations.  …& that’s everyone, innit?
John’s picture page, though well-meaning, is terrible. There certainly are universal rules for charting. Here’s one: include all the info you need to communicate the data, but no more. Which really means, you need very, very little if you know what you’re doing. Title should be the headline (not an attempt at wit). What does the graph tell you? There’s the title. He has Google and Apple, twice..wastin’ my time. Always bin up the x&y, and truncate even if you do have the space, which you don’t & no one likes clutter. Yes, that background advice is BS, and if that noisy space between the x dashes and the year are representative of that year (it looks sloppy), I mean, look at all that’s going on in there. I’d either ask a more appropriate question (perhaps the one offered by felixsalmon), or a better by month/by year metric, or a different visual all together. Also, he’s loosing an opportunity to tell us more on the left y. Maybe the capped price could run along there. Let the data speak, translate it clearly while making it effortless to read without mimicking what we are used to seeing… because it’s probably wrong. Long story longer: Trees, Maps and Theorems.

felixsalmon:

This picture has been doing the rounds, and it’s certainly an interesting explanation of the Economist’s house style. I particularly like the idea of a red rectangle as a way of keeping the chart identified as coming from the Economist, even when it moves onto Twitter, Tumblr, etc. But, why on earth would you want to “move the chart as far into the background as possible”? There’s an inferiority complex, here, with respect to “the surrounding article”, which is unhealthy.

Most interesting, however, is the squib at the bottom, saying that the chart “has been created for educational purposes only” and “has not been created by The Economist”. Which means that this chart shows what a *designer* thinks an Economist chart should look like. As opposed to a data visualization professional, who understands numbers and how to convey information using charts. Read More…

… and a “warm welcome”? You have approx 3 seconds to suck me in. There’s no time for cuddling in visualizing data. 

Engineer & applied physicists, Jean-luc Doumon, spinning in his grave. Just kidding, he’s alive and well, selling a fantastic (necessary/expensive) book for anyone interested in visualizing & communicating data…or, for those of us who are punished by eyesore presentations.  …& that’s everyone, innit?

John’s picture page, though well-meaning, is terrible. There certainly are universal rules for charting. Here’s one: include all the info you need to communicate the data, but no more. Which really means, you need very, very little if you know what you’re doing. Title should be the headline (not an attempt at wit). What does the graph tell you? There’s the title. He has Google and Apple, twice..wastin’ my time. Always bin up the x&y, and truncate even if you do have the space, which you don’t & no one likes clutter. Yes, that background advice is BS, and if that noisy space between the x dashes and the year are representative of that year (it looks sloppy), I mean, look at all that’s going on in there. I’d either ask a more appropriate question (perhaps the one offered by felixsalmon), or a better by month/by year metric, or a different visual all together. Also, he’s loosing an opportunity to tell us more on the left y. Maybe the capped price could run along there. Let the data speak, translate it clearly while making it effortless to read without mimicking what we are used to seeing… because it’s probably wrong. Long story longer: Trees, Maps and Theorems.

This one and his serious ears, putting a stop to my transcribing.

This one and his serious ears, putting a stop to my transcribing.

Can brain science + several little motors + a cell phone expand the limits of our biology?

We’re undertaking an audacious task: developing the most advanced sensory substitution system to-date. We’re building a wearable vest that communicates sound to the brain using the sense of touch.  We expect this will be powerful enough to give deaf individuals a new “sense” of hearing. via

SCIENCE CALLING: Hi, my lab-mate made a vest where you can hear though ”compressed and translated audio that can be understood using vibrations on the skin’.…hearing through your skin.You might want to help make this happen.

Can brain science + several little motors + a cell phone expand the limits of our biology?

We’re undertaking an audacious task: developing the most advanced sensory substitution system to-date. We’re building a wearable vest that communicates sound to the brain using the sense of touch.  We expect this will be powerful enough to give deaf individuals a new “sense” of hearing. via

SCIENCE CALLING: Hi, my lab-mate made a vest where you can hear though ”compressed and translated audio that can be understood using vibrations on the skin’.…hearing through your skin.You might want to help make this happen.

Eagleman Lab outing

  • We learned gun safety
  • We tested out 4 types of guns
  • We learned I’m a terrible shot
  • We talked rational gun policy in the US
People from Google and TED came by the lab, and I responded.

People from Google and TED came by the lab, and I responded.

Oh no, he loves belly rubs! Help me name him.

Oh no, he loves belly rubs! Help me name him.

We just launched a journal. 

Google Is Offering Free Coding Lessons To Women And Minorities

If you’re not taking all the coding classes right this second, do it. DOIT.

Me today.

Dad Gets Brain Injury From Headbanging to Motörhead

Doctors at Hannover Medical School in Germany treated a 50-year-old man earlier this year complaining of constant headaches that were only getting worse. He had no history of head injuries or drug problems, but told doctors that he had been headbanging at a Motörhead concert with his son the month before. After scanning his head, doctors found a brain bleed.
According to their case study published today in medical journal the Lancet, doctors then drilled a hole in the man’s head to drain the blood, after which his headaches stopped. It was all the headbanging. [via]

Dad Gets Brain Injury From Headbanging to Motörhead

Doctors at Hannover Medical School in Germany treated a 50-year-old man earlier this year complaining of constant headaches that were only getting worse. He had no history of head injuries or drug problems, but told doctors that he had been headbanging at a Motörhead concert with his son the month before. After scanning his head, doctors found a brain bleed.

According to their case study published today in medical journal the Lancet, doctors then drilled a hole in the man’s head to drain the blood, after which his headaches stopped. It was all the headbanging. [via]

I have another paper in the works about this sort of thing and thought I’d reach out to the guys at BLR. Just disgusted with how much I adore them, so great…

The drone technologically is more advanced than the human brain.
Yemeni President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi, in regard to the “accuracy of the remotely operated aircraft” (via)
Breezed through most of this tonight. Get it. You’ll be fascinated by the case studies, learn relevant neuroanatomy, ride along the fMRI tech talk, giggle and leave with a hankering for a good steak and a martini. 
I’m officially re-inspired. Really looking forward to meeting Dr. Kiehl next week!

Breezed through most of this tonight. Get it. You’ll be fascinated by the case studies, learn relevant neuroanatomy, ride along the fMRI tech talk, giggle and leave with a hankering for a good steak and a martini. 

I’m officially re-inspired. Really looking forward to meeting Dr. Kiehl next week!