psydoc8

Oct 17

…important literature in my lab today. 

…important literature in my lab today. 

Oct 11

"A banana."

"A banana."

Oct 10

“What stops us from looking at ourselves is that we’re kind of ugly if we look really hard; we’re not who we think we are, and we’re not as wonderful as we think we are.” — Prof. Bill Murray [x]

SEX IS SEX. BUT MONEY IS MONEY. -

criminalwisdom:

I arrived in New York City from Chelyabinsk, a city right in the middle of Russia, when I was 19 years old, with $300 in my pocket. I turned 24 in March and have managed to save $200,000, by fucking for money. I’ve traveled to Morocco, Paris, Beijing, and Monaco. Men have brought me tea from London, chocolates from Switzerland, lingerie from France and shoes from Italy. I’ve bought my parents a little village house. (I told them I had a rich American boyfriend who was taking care of me.)

I don’t hate men. I am not a victim of child trafficking. I have never been raped, or drugged, or done porn. I’m not an addict. I never had a pimp. I don’t suffer from what my American girlfriends call “daddy issues” and what my shrink refers to as “malformed identity centering on early childhood abandonment.”

[…]

I’m a businesswoman. I did what politicians in this country are always encouraging immigrants to do. Work hard, seize opportunity, maximize your talents, and adjust and adapt to the new world economy.

(Source: Metafilter)

Alright, if all that’s wasn’t your jam (weird), then how about this. Also, someone find me a few sex workers to interview for an article we’re doing: reliable data is scarce (shock), so time to make friends. 

“We conclude that there is a pattern and practice of conduct at Rikers that violates the constitutional rights of adolescent inmates. In particular, we find that adolescent inmates at Rikers are not adequately protected from harm, including serious physical harm from the rampant use of unnecessary and excessive force by DOC staff. In addition, adolescent inmates are not adequately protected from harm caused by violence inflicted by other inmates, including inmate-on-inmate fights. Indeed, we find that a deep-seated culture of violence is pervasive throughout the adolescent facilities at Rikers, and DOC staff routinely utilize force not as a last resort, but instead as a means to control the adolescent population and punish disorderly or disrespectful behavior. Moreover, DOC relies far too heavily on punitive segregation as a disciplinary measure, placing adolescent inmates—many of whom are mentally ill—in what amounts to solitary confinement at an alarming rate and for excessive periods of time.” —

Letter to Mayor de Blasio and the Commissioner of New York City Department of Corrections, from the U.S. Department of Justice, United States Attorney, Southern District of New York. 

To those busy patting yourself on the back for the attention that solitary confinement for juveniles is getting, great. But that is just one of 80 pages worth of problems that also need attention. 

"Simply put, Rikers is a dangerous place for adolescents and a pervasive climate of fear exists." 

OK. Over the span of two years, I’ve targeted over a dozen state, county and overseas jurisdictions, and collected 30 million crime records. Each request, is its own puzzling, expensive, long and tedious process - making it no surprise why it’s never been done before. 
Some jurisdictions are willing to collaborate, and eager to learn solutions, deserving a nod of approval. Others (I can disclose later) are set up so that it is easy for them to approve my requests in such a way that the data is useless, sometimes they don’t read the the requests at all, or even acknowledge receipt of my request (hard eye to California). Worst of all, some areas behave as if they have something to hide. We are legally dealing with those states now in the most active way possible. 
My harebrained hypothesis is: there is a correlation between something as simple as the official response to the type of data I’m requesting, and the manner in which that response is executed), and what we eventually find in the data. Meaning, how defendants, offenders are treated (reflected in the data) is intrinsically related to one of the most basic levels of the criminal justice system. Can I test this? Yes. Will that help? Donno.
It’s possible to process data in such a way that it highlights where the process could be more effective, and where they are wasting resources. The effect on individual lives and public health are real, damaging and costly. It’s not incredibly difficult to reverse engineer the types of bottlenecking I’m experiencing on a very basic level, and arrive at lack of resources, budgetary constraints, understaffing, outdated technology and administrative incompetency. The same excuses reported by authorities for when atrocities happen.  Unacceptable & preventable.
I asked you guys to help get me where I am today, and you did (lymi). Since then, it’s been a great experience that will soon bare meaningful results. So far, this has all been very legal-beagle, but I’m also involved in applying neuroscience to aspects of the CJS along the way. The juicy what brain does what & why, decision making, punishment and recidivism. In the coming months, our group with be inviting collaborators in, launching a journal, wrapping up half a dozen papers, and sending our findings in a report to the agencies that have the power to improve. Is it naive to think something will come of this? Did I pick the wrong week to stop sniffing glue? Some Qs are easier for science to answer than others. 
This has been a T2B post.
—-
Yes, so the book shown above: a great first effort for a law school text, by a superb group of scholars…but if you’ve been with me for long, you’ve already read most of it. 

OK. Over the span of two years, I’ve targeted over a dozen state, county and overseas jurisdictions, and collected 30 million crime records. Each request, is its own puzzling, expensive, long and tedious process - making it no surprise why it’s never been done before.

Some jurisdictions are willing to collaborate, and eager to learn solutions, deserving a nod of approval. Others (I can disclose later) are set up so that it is easy for them to approve my requests in such a way that the data is useless, sometimes they don’t read the the requests at all, or even acknowledge receipt of my request (hard eye to California). Worst of all, some areas behave as if they have something to hide. We are legally dealing with those states now in the most active way possible.

My harebrained hypothesis is: there is a correlation between something as simple as the official response to the type of data I’m requesting, and the manner in which that response is executed), and what we eventually find in the data. Meaning, how defendants, offenders are treated (reflected in the data) is intrinsically related to one of the most basic levels of the criminal justice system. Can I test this? Yes. Will that help? Donno.

It’s possible to process data in such a way that it highlights where the process could be more effective, and where they are wasting resources. The effect on individual lives and public health are real, damaging and costly. It’s not incredibly difficult to reverse engineer the types of bottlenecking I’m experiencing on a very basic level, and arrive at lack of resources, budgetary constraints, understaffing, outdated technology and administrative incompetency. The same excuses reported by authorities for when atrocities happen.  Unacceptable & preventable.

I asked you guys to help get me where I am today, and you did (lymi). Since then, it’s been a great experience that will soon bare meaningful results. So far, this has all been very legal-beagle, but I’m also involved in applying neuroscience to aspects of the CJS along the way. The juicy what brain does what & why, decision making, punishment and recidivism. In the coming months, our group with be inviting collaborators in, launching a journal, wrapping up half a dozen papers, and sending our findings in a report to the agencies that have the power to improve. Is it naive to think something will come of this? Did I pick the wrong week to stop sniffing glue? Some Qs are easier for science to answer than others. 

This has been a T2B post.

—-

Yes, so the book shown above: a great first effort for a law school text, by a superb group of scholars…but if you’ve been with me for long, you’ve already read most of it. 

[video]

Oct 08

swandive

swandive

Sep 25

(Source: tiemydurag, via party-wok)

Sep 15

Im gonna go ahead and just build a therapy robot that rolls up and plays smooth jams when I need it.

Im gonna go ahead and just build a therapy robot that rolls up and plays smooth jams when I need it.

Sep 09

(Source: lahlahlindsey, via cordjefferson)

felixsalmon:

This picture has been doing the rounds, and it’s certainly an interesting explanation of the Economist’s house style. I particularly like the idea of a red rectangle as a way of keeping the chart identified as coming from the Economist, even when it moves onto Twitter, Tumblr, etc. But, why on earth would you want to “move the chart as far into the background as possible”? There’s an inferiority complex, here, with respect to “the surrounding article”, which is unhealthy.
Most interesting, however, is the squib at the bottom, saying that the chart “has been created for educational purposes only” and “has not been created by The Economist”. Which means that this chart shows what a *designer* thinks an Economist chart should look like. As opposed to a data visualization professional, who understands numbers and how to convey information using charts. Read More…

… and a “warm welcome”? You have approx 3 seconds to suck me in. There’s no time for cuddling in visualizing data. 
Engineer & applied physicists, Jean-luc Doumon, spinning in his grave. Just kidding, he’s alive and well, selling a fantastic (necessary/expensive) book for anyone interested in visualizing & communicating data…or, for those of us who are punished by eyesore presentations.  …& that’s everyone, innit?
John’s picture page, though well-meaning, is terrible. There certainly are universal rules for charting. Here’s one: include all the info you need to communicate the data, but no more. Which really means, you need very, very little if you know what you’re doing. Title should be the headline (not an attempt at wit). What does the graph tell you? There’s the title. He has Google and Apple, twice..wastin’ my time. Always bin up the x&y, and truncate even if you do have the space, which you don’t & no one likes clutter. Yes, that background advice is BS, and if that noisy space between the x dashes and the year are representative of that year (it looks sloppy), I mean, look at all that’s going on in there. I’d either ask a more appropriate question (perhaps the one offered by felixsalmon), or a better by month/by year metric, or a different visual all together. Also, he’s loosing an opportunity to tell us more on the left y. Maybe the capped price could run along there. Let the data speak, translate it clearly while making it effortless to read without mimicking what we are used to seeing… because it’s probably wrong. Long story longer: Trees, Maps and Theorems.

felixsalmon:

This picture has been doing the rounds, and it’s certainly an interesting explanation of the Economist’s house style. I particularly like the idea of a red rectangle as a way of keeping the chart identified as coming from the Economist, even when it moves onto Twitter, Tumblr, etc. But, why on earth would you want to “move the chart as far into the background as possible”? There’s an inferiority complex, here, with respect to “the surrounding article”, which is unhealthy.

Most interesting, however, is the squib at the bottom, saying that the chart “has been created for educational purposes only” and “has not been created by The Economist”. Which means that this chart shows what a *designer* thinks an Economist chart should look like. As opposed to a data visualization professional, who understands numbers and how to convey information using charts. Read More…

… and a “warm welcome”? You have approx 3 seconds to suck me in. There’s no time for cuddling in visualizing data. 

Engineer & applied physicists, Jean-luc Doumon, spinning in his grave. Just kidding, he’s alive and well, selling a fantastic (necessary/expensive) book for anyone interested in visualizing & communicating data…or, for those of us who are punished by eyesore presentations.  …& that’s everyone, innit?

John’s picture page, though well-meaning, is terrible. There certainly are universal rules for charting. Here’s one: include all the info you need to communicate the data, but no more. Which really means, you need very, very little if you know what you’re doing. Title should be the headline (not an attempt at wit). What does the graph tell you? There’s the title. He has Google and Apple, twice..wastin’ my time. Always bin up the x&y, and truncate even if you do have the space, which you don’t & no one likes clutter. Yes, that background advice is BS, and if that noisy space between the x dashes and the year are representative of that year (it looks sloppy), I mean, look at all that’s going on in there. I’d either ask a more appropriate question (perhaps the one offered by felixsalmon), or a better by month/by year metric, or a different visual all together. Also, he’s loosing an opportunity to tell us more on the left y. Maybe the capped price could run along there. Let the data speak, translate it clearly while making it effortless to read without mimicking what we are used to seeing… because it’s probably wrong. Long story longer: Trees, Maps and Theorems.

This one and his serious ears, putting a stop to my transcribing.

This one and his serious ears, putting a stop to my transcribing.

Sep 08

Can brain science + several little motors + a cell phone expand the limits of our biology?

We’re undertaking an audacious task: developing the most advanced sensory substitution system to-date. We’re building a wearable vest that communicates sound to the brain using the sense of touch.  We expect this will be powerful enough to give deaf individuals a new “sense” of hearing. via

SCIENCE CALLING: Hi, my lab-mate made a vest where you can hear though ”compressed and translated audio that can be understood using vibrations on the skin’.…hearing through your skin.You might want to help make this happen.

Can brain science + several little motors + a cell phone expand the limits of our biology?

We’re undertaking an audacious task: developing the most advanced sensory substitution system to-date. We’re building a wearable vest that communicates sound to the brain using the sense of touch.  We expect this will be powerful enough to give deaf individuals a new “sense” of hearing. via

SCIENCE CALLING: Hi, my lab-mate made a vest where you can hear though ”compressed and translated audio that can be understood using vibrations on the skin’.…hearing through your skin.You might want to help make this happen.

Aug 04

[video]