Psydoc’s Neurolaw Archives

This will serve as our official archive of neurolaw related journal articles… continuously updated and possibly in need of formatting.


Towards Justice: Neuroscience and Affirmative Defenses at the ICC

Intoxication, Recklessness and Negligence

Are Addicts Akratic?: Interpreting the Neuroscience of Reward

1984

Neuropsychological and Early Environmental Correlates of Sex Differences in Crime

1986

Legal Recognition of Neocortical Death

1988

Human Biology and Criminal Responsibility: Free Will or Free Ride?

1991

Cognitive Science and the Sufficiency of “Sufficiency of the Evidence” Tests

1992

Forensic Neuropsychology and the Criminal Law

1992

A Cognitive Science Approach to Teaching Property Rights in Body Parts

1993

Eliminative Materialism, Neuroscience and the Criminal Law

1994

Gender, Crime, and the Criminal Law Defenses

1994

Alternate diagnoses to consider in mild head trauma cases

1994

The Sevin Made Me Do It: Mental Non-Responsibility and the Neurotoxic Damage Defense

1995

Mild traumatic brain injury and the postconcussion syndrome: Comment on some new definitions

1995

True and False Memories in Children and Adults: A Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective

1995

Pattern-based memory and the writing used to refresh

1996

Evidentiary Admissibility of Evidence of Neurodiagnostic Testing Showing Frontal Brain Lesion as a Defense in a Criminal Homicide Trial

1996

The Neuropsychological Autopsy

1996

Brain, Mind, and Criminal Behavior: Neuroimages as Scientific Evidence

1996

Causal Relation Between Brain Damage and Homicide: The Prosecution

1996

Medical-Legal Inferences from Functional Neuroimaging Evidence

1996

Brain and Blame

1996

Impulsive Homicide Associated with an Arachnoid Cyst and Unilateral Frontotemporal Cerebral Dysfunction

1996

Brain Damage and Legal Responsibility

1996

The Legal Admissibility of Positron Emission Tomography Scans in Criminal Cases: People v. Spyder Cystkopf

1997

Investigation of Vehicle Driving Ability in Two Diagnostic Groups of Epileptic Patients With Special Neuropsychological Approach

1997

Presenting neuropsychological evidence in traumatic brain injury litigation

997

Psychiatric Neuroimaging Evidence: A High-Tech Crystal Ball?

1997

Medical Conditions & Driving: Legal Requirements & Approach Of Neurologists

1997

Persistent Vegetative State: Medical, Ethical, Religious, Economic and Legal Perspectives

1997

Securities Regulation in an Electronic Age: The Impact of Cognitive Psychology

1998

Neurobiology of Reconstructed Memory

1998

The Neuropsychologist in Brain Injury Cases

1998

Toward a New Test for the Insanity Defense: Incorporating the Discoveries of Neuroscience into Moral and Legal Theories

1999

Impairment of Social and Moral Behavior Related to Early Damage in Human Prefrontal Cortex

1999

The Law and the Brain: Judging Scientific Evidence of Intent

1999

Incompetence in the Brain Injured Individual

1999

Brain Policy: How the New Neuroscience Will Change Our Lives and Our Politics

1999

Critical Race Theory, Cognitive Psychology, and the Social Meaning of Race: Why Individualism Will Not Solve Racism

1999

The Science of Addiction: Research and Public Health Perspectives

1999

Refuting Diagnostic and Neuropsychological Testing in Toxic Tort Cases

2000

Criminal Penalties for Creating a Toxic Environment: Mens Rea, Environmental Criminal Liability Standard and the Neurotoxicity Hypothesis

2000

Applying the Basic Principles of Cognitive Science to the Standard State Zoning Enabling Act

2000

Real Employees: Cognitive Psychology and the Adjudication of Non-Competition Agreements

2000

Before It’s Too Late: Neuropsychological Consequences of Child Neglect and Their Implications for Law and Social Policy

2001

Artificial Intelligence, Mindreading and Reasoning in Law

2001

Mapping Cortical Areas Associated With Legal Reasoning and Moral Intuition

2001

Time-shifted Rationality and the Law of Law’s Leverage: Behavioral Economics Meets Behavioral Biology

2001

Brain Plasticity and Spanish Moss In Biolegal Analysis

2001

The Human Genome Project: Ethical and Legal Considerations for Neuroscience Nurses

2001

The Divergence of Neuroscience and Law

2002

Responsibility for Addiction

2002

Neuroimaging of emotion and personality: scientific evidence and ethical considerations

2002

Crime and Consciousness: Science and Involuntary Acts

2002

Emerging Ethical Issues in Neuroscience

2002

A Critique on the Concept of “Brain Death”

2002

Brain Fingerprinting - Can It Be Used to Detect the Innocence of Persons Charged With a Crime?

2002

Cognitive Psychology and Optimal Government Design

2002

Three Card Monte, Monty Hall, Modus Operandi and “Offender Profiling”: Some Lessons of Modern Cognitive Science for the Law of Evidence

2002

The Daubert/Kumho Implications of Observer Effects in Forensic Science: Hidden Problems of Expectation and Suggestion

2002

Neuroethics for the New Millennium

2002

Juvenile Justice Caught Between the Exorcist and a Clockwork Orange

2002

Freedom and Constraint in Adjudication: A Look Through the Lens of Cognitive Psychology

2002

Recent Work on Addiction and Responsible Agency

2003

Danger at the Edge of Chaos: Predicting Violent Behavior in a Post-Daubert World

2003

Cognitive Neuroscience as a Model for Neural Software Patent Examination

2003

Brain Trauma and the Myth of the Resilient Child

2003

Limitations of Brain Imaging in Forensic Psychiatry

2003

Psychoactive Medication and Your Client: Better Living and (Maybe) Better Law Through Chemistry

2003

The Admissibility of Expert Testimony About Cognitive Science Research on Eyewitness Identification

2003

Less Guilty by Reason of Adolescence: Developmental Immaturity, Diminished Responsibility, and the Juvenile Death Penalty

2004

The Precautionary Principle: A New Legal Standard for a Technological Age

2004

Neurocops: The Politics of Prohibition and the Future of Enforcing Social Policy From Inside the Body

2004

Monitoring and manipulating brain function: new neuroscience technologies and their ethical implications

2004

The Implications of Developmental Cognitive Research on “Evolving Standards of Decency” and the Imposition of the Death Penalty on Juveniles

2004

Neuroscience and the Law: Brain, Mind, and the Scales of Justice

2004

Free Will in the 21st Century: A Discussion of Neuroscience and the Law

2004

Prediction, Litigation, Privacy, and Property: Some Possible Legal and Social Implications of Advances in Neuroscience

2004

For the Law, Neuroscience Changes Nothing and Everything

2004

Insights From Cognitive Psychology

2004

The Situational Character: A Critical Realist Perspective on the Human Animal

2004

A status report on the practice of forensic neuropsychology

2004

A Fish Story? Brain Maps, Lie Detection, and Personhood

2004

Using Our Brains: What Cognitive Science and Social Psychology Teach Us About Teaching Law Students to Make Ethical, Professionally Responsible, Choices

2004

New Neuroscience, Old Problems

2004

Evidence, Procedure, and the Upside of Cognitive Error

2004

The Frontal Cortex and the Criminal Justice System

2004

The Criminal Brain: Frontal Lobe Dysfunction Evidence in Capital Proceedings

2004

Reflections of a Recovering Lawyer: How Becoming a Cognitive Psychologist—and (In Particular) Studying Analogical and Causal Reasoning— Changed My Views About the Field of Psychology and Law

2004

Neuroscience Developments and the Law

2005

Behavioral Genetics and the Punishment of Crime

2005

What Lawyers Know: Lawyering Expertise, Cognitive Science, and the Functions of Theory

2005

Law and the Emotions: The Problems of Affective Forecasting

2005

Brains, Lies, and Psychological Explanations

2005

When Genes and Brains Unite: Ethical Implications of Genomic Neuroimaging

2005

Neuroeconomics and Rationality

2005

Law and Neuroeconomics

2005

Moral Decision-making and the Brain

2005

Neuroethics: The Practical and the Philosophical

2005

Poverty, Privilege and the Developing Brain: Empirical Findings and Ethical Implications

2005

Functional Neurosurgical Intervention: Neuroethics in the Operating Room

2005

Engineering the Mind

2005

Facts, Fictions and the Future of Neuroethics

2005

The Social Effects of Advances in Neuroscience: Legal Problems, Legal Perspectives

2005

Premarket Approval Regulation for Lie Detection: An Idea Whose Time May Be Coming

2005

From Genome to Brainome: Charting Lessons Learned

2005

Moody Investing and the Supreme Court: Rethinking the Materiality of Information and the Reasonableness of Investors

2005

Neuroethics: Defining the Issues in Theory, Practice and Policy

2005

A Picture is Worth 1000 Words, but Which 1000?

2005

Ethical Dilemmas in Neurodegenerative Disease: Respecting the Margins of Agency

2005

Law and Behavioral Biology

2005

Protecting the Objectivity, Fairness, and Integrity of Neuropsychological Evaluations in Litigation

2005

Clinicians, Patients and the Brain

2005

Protecting Human Subjects in Brain Research: A Pragmatic Perspective

2005

The Mind in the Movies: A Neuroethical Analysis of the Portrayal of the Mind in Popular Media

2005

Moral and Legal Responsibility and the New Neuroscience

2005

High-Tech Proof in Brain Injury Cases

2005

Creativity, Gratitude and the Enhancement Debate: On the Fertile Tension Between Two Ethical Frameworks

2005

Arrested Development: Juveniles’ Immature Brains Make Them Less Culpable Than Adults

2005

A Case Study in Neuroethics: The Nature of Moral Judgment

2005

Applications of Behavioural Genetics: Outpacing the Science?

2005

A Disconnect Between Law and Neuroscience: Modern Brain Science, Media Influences, and Juvenile Justice

2005

The Relevance of Brain Research to Juvenile Defense

2005

Neuroethics in Education

2005

Trascranial Magnetic Stimulation and the Human Brain: An Ethical Evaluation

2005

The Legality of the Use of Psychiatric Neuroimaging in Intelligence Interrogation

2005

A Primer on the Law and Ethics of Treatment, Research, and Public Policy in the Context of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

2005

The Confidentiality and Privacy Implications of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

2005

“I Know Better Than That”: The Role of Emotions and the Brain in Family Law Disputes

2005

Religious Responses to Neuroscientific Questions

2005

Being in the World

2006

Neuroethics Needed: Researchers Should Speak Out on Claims Made on Behalf of Their Science

2006

Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Lie Detection: Is a “Brainstorm” Heading Toward the “Gatekeeper”?

2006

The Emergence of Consequential Thought: Evidence from Neuroscience

2006

As Its Next Witness, the State Calls … the Defendant: Brain Fingerprinting As “Testimonial” Under the Fifth Amendment

2006

Responding to Juror Bias—Gaining Insight From Cognitive Neuroscience

2006

Genetic Predictions of Future Dangerousness: Is There a Blueprint for Violence?

2006

Cognitive Dissonance Revisited: Roper v. Simmons and the Issue of Adolescent Decision-Making Competence

2006

Improving Prosecutorial Decision Making: Some Lessons of Cognitive Science

2006

Wanting, Liking, and Learning: Neuroscience and Paternalism

2006

The Brain and the Law

2006

Neuroscience and the In Corpore-ted First Amendment

2006

Revisiting the Legal Link Between Genetics and Crime

2006

“Developing Capacity”: Adolescent “Consent” at Work, at Law, and in the Sciences of the Mind

2006

Behavioral Economics: Human Errors and Market Correction

2006

Neuroanatomical Background to Understanding the Brain of the Young Psychopath

2006

Genetics and Responsibility: To Know the Criminal From the Crime

2006

The Emperor Has No Clothes: Postmodern Legal Thought and Cognitive Science

2006

A Cognitive Neuroscience Framework for Understanding Causal Reasoning and the Law

2006

Considering Convergence: A Policy Dialogue About Behavioral Genetics, Neuroscience, and Law

2006

Cognitive Neuroscience and the Law

2006

A Neuroscientific Approach to Normative Judgment in Law and Justice

2006

Responsibility and Punishment: Whose Mind? A Response

2006

Neuroethics and ELSI: Similarities and Differences

2006

Implicit Bias: Scientific Foundations

2006

Neurobiology and the Law: A Role in Juvenile Justice?

2006

The Cognitive Psychology of Circumstantial Evidence

2006

Law and the Sources of Morality

2006

The Neuroeconomic Path of the Law

2006

How Reversible Is Methamphetamine-Related Brain Damage?

2006

Incidental findings in brain imaging research

2006

Behavioral Genetics and Crime, in Context

2006

Law, Evolution, and the Brain: Applications and Open Questions

2006

Behavioral Genetics Research and Criminal DNA Databases

2006

Cross-Examining the Brain: A Legal Analysis of Neural Imaging for Credibility Impeachment

2006

Therapeutic Forgetting: The Legal and Ethical Implications of Memory Dampening

2006

Emotional Competence, “Rational Understanding,” and the Criminal Defendant

2006

Your Thoughts May Deceive You: The Constitutional Implications of Brain Fingerprinting Technology and How It May Be Used to Secure Our Skies

2006

Antidiscrimination Law and the Perils of Mindreading

2006

Brain Overclaim Syndrome and Criminal Responsibility: A Diagnostic Note

2006

Addiction, Genetics and Criminal Responsibility

2006

Evidence History, the New Trace Evidence, and Rumblings in the Future of Proof

2006

Neurocongress

2006

How Neuroscience Might Advance the Law

2006

Cognitive and Moral Development, Brain Development, and Mental Illness: Important Considerations for the Juvenile Justice System

2006

Neuroscience Evidence, Legal Culture, and Criminal Procedure

2006

Lure of lie detectors spooks ethicists

2006

The Promise (and Limits) of Neuroeconomics

2006

fMRI In the Public Eye

2006

Brain imaging: a decade of coverage in the print media

2006

The Brain-Disordered Defendant: Neuroscience and Legal Insanity in the Twenty-First Century

2006

The Scarlet Gene: Behavioral Genetics, Criminal Law, and Racial and Ethnic Stigma

2006

Neuroeconomics: cross-currents in research on decision-making

2006

Law in the Digital Age: How Visual Communication Technologies are Transforming the Practice, Theory, and Teaching of Law

2006

A Cognitive Neurobiological Account of Deception: Evidence From Functional Neuroimaging

2006

The Property “Instinct”

2006

A New Wave of Police Interrogation? “Brain Fingerprinting,” the Constitutional Privilege Against Self-Incrimination, and Hearsay Jurisprudence

To add in: 

Abe, Nobuhito, Toshikatsu Fujii, Kazumi Hirayama, Atsushi Takeda, Yoshiyuki Hosokai, Toshiyuki Ishioka, Yoshiyuki Nishio, et al. “Do Parkinsonian Patients Have Trouble Telling Lies? The Neurobiological Basis of Deceptive Behaviour.” Brain 132, no. 5 (May 1, 2009): 1386–1395.

Abe, Nobuhito, Jiro Okuda, Maki Suzuki, Hiroshi Sasaki, Tetsuya Matsuda, Etsuro Mori, Minoru Tsukada, and Toshikatsu Fujii. “Neural Correlates of True Memory, False Memory, and Deception.” Cerebral Cortex 18, no. 12 (December 1, 2008): 2811–2819.

Abe, Nobuhito, Maki Suzuki, Takashi Tsukiura, Etsuro Mori, Keiichiro Yamaguchi, Masatoshi Itoh, and Toshikatsu Fujii. “Dissociable Roles of Prefrontal and Anterior Cingulate Cortices in Deception.” Cerebral Cortex 16, no. 2 (February 1, 2006): 192–199.

Aggarwal, Neil K. “Neuroimaging, Culture, and Forensic Psychiatry.” The Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law 37, no. 2 (2009): 239–244.

Annas, George J. “Foreword: Imagining a New Era of Neuroimaging, Neuroethics, and Neurolaw.” American Journal of Law & Medicine 33, no. 2–3 (2007): 163–170.

Balas, Benjamin J, Charles A Nelson, Alissa Westerlund, Vanessa Vogel-Farley, Tracy Riggins, and Dana Kuefner. “Personal Familiarity Influences the Processing of Upright and Inverted Faces in Infants.” Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4 (2010): 1.

Bard, Jennifer S. “‘Oh Yes, I Remember It Well’: Why the Inherent Unreliability of Technology Which Purports to Retrieve Human Memories Makes It Inappropriate for Forensice Use.” SSRN Electronic Journal (2011). http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1813425.

Baskin, Joseph H, Judith G Edersheim, and Bruce H Price. “Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Words? Neuroimaging in the Courtroom.” American Journal of Law & Medicine 33, no. 2–3 (2007): 239–269.

Benforado, Adam, and Jon Hanson. “The Great Attributional Divide: How Divergent Views of Human Behavior Are Shaping Legal Policy” (March 18, 2008). http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1106684.

Burgoon, J. K. “The Dynamic Nature of Deceptive Verbal Communication.” Journal of Language and Social Psychology 25, no. 1 (March 1, 2006): 76–96.

Canli, Turhan, and Zenab Amin. “Neuroimaging of Emotion and Personality: Scientific Evidence and Ethical Considerations.” Brain and Cognition 50, no. 3 (December 2002): 414–431.

Christ, Shawn E, David C Van Essen, Jason M Watson, Lindsay E Brubaker, and Kathleen B McDermott. “The Contributions of Prefrontal Cortex and Executive Control to Deception: Evidence from Activation Likelihood Estimate Meta-Analyses.” Cerebral Cortex 19, no. 7 (July 1, 2009): 1557–1566.

Conti, Fiorenzo, and Gilberto Corbellini. “Italian Neuroscientists Are Ready to Start the Debate.” Nature 451, no. 7179 (February 7, 2008): 627.

Deslauriers, C, E Bell, N Palmour, B Pike, J Doyon, and E Racine. “Perspectives of Canadian Researchers on Ethics Review of Neuroimaging Research.” Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics: JERHRE 5, no. 1 (March 2010): 49–66.

Desmond, John E, and S H Annabel Chen. “Ethical Issues in the Clinical Application of fMRI: Factors Affecting the Validity and Interpretation of Activations.” Brain and Cognition 50, no. 3 (December 2002): 482–497.

Dossey, Larry. “Neurolaw or Frankenlaw? The Thought Police Have Arrived.” EXPLORE: The Journal of Science and Healing 6, no. 5 (September 2010): 275–286.

Dresser, Rebecca. “Brain Imaging and Courtroom Deception” (February 19, 2011). http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1763304.

Druss, Benjamin G, and Thomas H Bornemann. “Improving Health and Health Care for Persons with Serious Mental Illness: The Window for US Federal Policy Change.” JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association 303, no. 19 (May 19, 2010): 1972–1973.

Erickson, Steven. “Blaming the Brain” (September 12, 2009). http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1472245.

Farah, Martha J, and Paul Root Wolpe. “Monitoring and Manipulating Brain Function: New Neuroscience Technologies and Their Ethical Implications.” The Hastings Center Report 34, no. 3 (June 2004): 35–45.

Farisco, M., and C. Petrini. “The Impact of Neuroscience and Genetics on the Law: A Recent Italian Case.” Neuroethics (n.d.): 1–3.

Fins, Joseph J, Nicholas D Schiff, and Kathleen M Foley. “Late Recovery from the Minimally Conscious State: Ethical and Policy Implications.” Neurology 68, no. 4 (January 23, 2007): 304–307.

Fullam, Rachael S, Shane McKie, and Mairead C Dolan. “Psychopathic Traits and Deception: Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.” The British Journal of Psychiatry 194, no. 3 (March 1, 2009): 229–235.

Gerard, Eric K. “Waiting in the Wings - The Admissibility of Neuroimagery for Lie Detection.” Developments in Mental Health Law 27 (2008): 1.

Giordano, James. “Unpacking Neuroscience and Neurotechnology - Instructions Not Included: Neuroethics Required.” Neuroethics (n.d.): 1–4.

Granacher, Robert P, Jr. “Commentary: Applications of Functional Neuroimaging to Civil Litigation of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.” The Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law 36, no. 3 (2008): 323–328.

Greely, Henry T, and Judy Illes. “Neuroscience-based Lie Detection: The Urgent Need for Regulation.” American Journal of Law & Medicine 33, no. 2–3 (2007): 377–431.

Greene, Joshua D, and Joseph M Paxton. “Patterns of Neural Activity Associated with Honest and Dishonest Moral Decisions.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 106, no. 30 (July 28, 2009): 12506–12511.

Illes, Judy, Matthew P. Kirschen, Emmeline Edwards, L R. Stanford, Peter Bandettini, Mildred K. Cho, Paul J. Ford, et al. “Incidental Findings in Brain Imaging Research.” Science (New York, N.Y.) 311, no. 5762 (February 10, 2006): 783–784.

Jones, Owen, Joshua Buckholtz, Jeffrey Schall, and Rene Marois. “Brain Imaging for Legal Thinkers: A Guide for the Perplexed” (March 4, 2010). http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1563612.

Karim, Ahmed A, Markus Schneider, Martin Lotze, Ralf Veit, Paul Sauseng, Christoph Braun, and Niels Birbaumer. “The Truth About Lying: Inhibition of the Anterior Prefrontal Cortex Improves Deceptive Behavior.” Cerebral Cortex 20, no. 1 (January 1, 2010): 205–213.

Kim, Brian S, Judy Illes, Richard T Kaplan, Allan Reiss, and Scott W Atlas. “Incidental Findings on Pediatric MR Images of the Brain.” AJNR. American Journal of Neuroradiology 23, no. 10 (December 2002): 1674–1677.

Klein, Eran. “Is There a Need for Clinical Neuroskepticism?” Neuroethics 4, no. 3 (2011): 251–259.

Knabb, Joshua J, Robert K Welsh, Joseph G Ziebell, and Kevin S Reimer. “Neuroscience, Moral Reasoning, and the Law.” Behavioral Sciences & the Law 27, no. 2 (March 1, 2009): 219–236.

Koenigs, Michael, and Daniel Tranel. “Irrational Economic Decision-Making After Ventromedial Prefrontal Damage: Evidence from the Ultimatum Game.” The Journal of Neuroscience : the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience 27, no. 4 (January 24, 2007): 951–956.

Langleben, Daniel D, and Frank M Dattilio. “Commentary: The Future of Forensic Functional Brain Imaging.” Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law Online 36, no. 4 (December 1, 2008): 502–504.

Littlefield, M. “Constructing the Organ of Deceit: The Rhetoric of fMRI and Brain Fingerprinting in Post-9/11 America.” Science, Technology & Human Values 34, no. 3 (April 29, 2008): 365–392.

Logothetis, Nikos K. “What We Can Do and What We Cannot Do with fMRI.” Nature 453, no. 7197 (June 12, 2008): 869–878.

“Lure of Lie Detectors Spooks Ethicists.” Nature 441, no. 7096 (June 22, 2006): 918–919.

Maroney, Terry. “The False Promise of Adolescent Brain Science in Juvenile Justice” (May 15, 2009). http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1405367.

Maxwell, Bruce, and Eric Racine. “The Ethics of Neuroeducation: Research, Practice and Policy.” Neuroethics (n.d.): 1–3.

McKenna, Phil. “Can a Brain Scan Prove You’re Telling the Truth?” The New Scientist 193, no. 2590 (February 10, 2007): 13.

Meegan, Daniel V. “Neuroimaging Techniques for Memory Detection: Scientific, Ethical, and Legal Issues.” The American Journal of Bioethics: AJOB 8, no. 1 (January 2008): 9–20.

Mobbs, Dean, Hakwan C Lau, Owen D Jones, and Christopher D Frith. “Law, Responsibility, and the Brain.” PLoS Biology 5, no. 4 (April 2007): e103.

Mohamed, Feroze B, Scott H Faro, Nathan J Gordon, Steven M Platek, Harris Ahmad, and J. Michael Williams. “Brain Mapping of Deception and Truth Telling About an Ecologically Valid Situation: Functional MR Imaging and Polygraph Investigation—Initial Experience1.” Radiology 238, no. 2 (February 1, 2006): 679–688.

Moll, Jorge, Ricardo De Oliveira-Souza, and Roland Zahn. “The Neural Basis of Moral Cognition: Sentiments, Concepts, and Values.” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1124 (March 2008): 161–180.

Moreno, Joelle Anne. “Future of Neuroimaged Lie Detection and the Law, The.” Akron Law Review 42 (2009): 717.

Nadelhoffer, Thomas, Stephanos Bibas, Scott Grafton, Kent Kiehl, Andrew Mansfield, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, and Michael Gazzaniga. “Neuroprediction, Violence, and the Law: Setting the Stage.” Neuroethics 5, no. 1 (2012): 67–99.

Nadelhoffer, Thomas. “Neural Lie Detection, Criterial Change, and OrdinaryLanguage.” Neuroethics 4, no. 3 (2011): 205–213.

Palmer, Colin, Bryan Paton, Trung Ngo, Richard Thomson, Jakob Hohwy, and Steven Miller. “Individual Differences in Moral Behaviour: A Role for Response to Risk and Uncertainty?” Neuroethics (n.d.): 1–7.

Pardo, Michael S., and Dennis Patterson. “Philosophical Foundations of Law and Neuroscience.” SSRN Electronic Journal (2009). http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1338763.

Perlin, Michael. “‘And I Can See Through Your Brain’: Access to Experts, Competency to Consent, and the Impact of Antipsychotic Medications in Neuroimaging Cases in the Criminal Trial Process” (February 4, 2009). http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1337219.

Priori, Alberto, F. Mameli, F. Cogiamanian, S. Marceglia, M. Tiriticco, S. Mrakic-Sposta, R. Ferrucci, S. Zago, D. Polezzi, and G. Sartori. “Lie-Specific Involvement of Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Deception.” Cerebral Cortex 18, no. 2 (February 1, 2008): 451–455.

Pustilnik, Amanda C. “Violence on the Brain: A Critique of Neuroscience in Criminal Law.” Wake Forest Law Review 44 (2009): 183.

Racine, E, R Amaram, M Seidler, M Karczewska, and J Illes. “Media Coverage of the Persistent Vegetative State and End-of-life Decision-making.” Neurology 71, no. 13 (September 23, 2008): 1027–1032.

Racine, Eric, Ofek Bar-Ilan, and Judy Illes. “Brain Imaging.” Science Communication 28, no. 1 (September 2006): 122–142.

Racine, Eric, and Judy Illes. “Emerging Ethical Challenges in Advanced Neuroimaging Research: Review, Recommendations and Research Agenda.” Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics: JERHRE 2, no. 2 (June 2007): 1–10.

Racine, Eric, Sarah Waldman, Jarett Rosenberg, and Judy Illes. “Details for Manuscript Number: SSM-D-09-00651 R2 ‘Contemporary Neuroscience in the Media’.” Social Science & Medicine (1982) 71, no. 4 (August 2010): 725–733.

Rakoff, Jed S. “Science and the Law: Uncomfortable Bedfellows.” Seton Hall Law Review 38 (2008): 1379.

Robertson, Diana, John Snarey, Opal Ousley, Keith Harenski, F DuBois Bowman, Rick Gilkey, and Clinton Kilts. “The Neural Processing of Moral Sensitivity to Issues of Justice and Care.” Neuropsychologia 45, no. 4 (March 2, 2007): 755–766.

Roskies, Adina. “Neuroethics for the New Millenium.” Neuron 35, no. 1 (July 3, 2002): 21–23.

Sanfey, Alan G, George Loewenstein, Samuel M McClure, and Jonathan D Cohen. “Neuroeconomics: Cross-currents in Research on Decision-making.” Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10, no. 3 (March 2006): 108–116.

Sapolsky, Robert M. “The Frontal Cortex and the Criminal Justice System.” Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences 359, no. 1451 (November 29, 2004): 1787–1796.

Sartori, Giuseppe, Sara Agosta, Cristina Zogmaister, Santo Davide Ferrara, and Umberto Castiello. “How to Accurately Detect Autobiographical Events.” Psychological Science 19, no. 8 (August 2008): 772–780.

Schultz, Johannes. “Brain Imaging: Decoding Your Memories.” Current Biology 20, no. 6 (March 23, 2010): R269–R271.

Shen, Francis, and Owen Jones. “Brain Scans as Evidence: Truths, Proofs, Lies, and Lessons” (February 24, 2011). http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1736288.

Simpson, Joseph R. “Functional MRI Lie Detection: Too Good to Be True?” Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law Online 36, no. 4 (December 1, 2008): 491–498.

Taylor, J S. “Neurolaw: Towards a New Medical Jurisprudence.” Brain Injury: [BI] 9, no. 7 (October 1995): 745–751.

Tenovuo, Olli. “Pharmacological Enhancement of Cognitive and Behavioral Deficits After Traumatic Brain Injury.” Current Opinion in Neurology 19, no. 6 (December 2006): 528–533.

Tovino, Stacey A. “Remarks: Neuroscience, Gender, and the Law.” Akron Law Review 42 (2009): 941.

Victoroff, Jeff. “Aggression, Science, and Law: The Origins Framework. Introduction.” International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 32, no. 4 (August 2009): 189–197.

Vincent, Nicole, Pim Haselager, and Gert-Jan Lokhorst. “‘The Neuroscience of Responsibility’—Workshop Report.” Neuroethics 4, no. 2 (2011): 175–178.

Vincent, Nicole. “Madness, Badness, and Neuroimaging-Based Responsibility Assessments” (April 12, 2010). http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1588038.

———. “Neuroimaging and Responsibility Assessments.” Neuroethics 4, no. 1 (2011): 35–49.

———. “On the Relevance of Neuroscience to Criminal Responsibility.” Criminal Law and Philosophy 4, no. 1 (2010): 77–98.

———. “Responsibility, Dysfunction and Capacity.” Neuroethics 1, no. 3 (2008): 199–204.

Vrij, Aldert, Pär Anders Granhag, and Stephen Porter. “Pitfalls and Opportunities in Nonverbal and Verbal Lie Detection.” Psychological Science in the Public Interest 11, no. 3 (December 1, 2010): 89–121.

Woodruff, William A. “Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Detect Deception: Not Ready for the Courtroom.” SSRN Electronic Journal (2011). http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1809761.

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