One of the things I look at:

… the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act. It’s proposed legislation by U.S. Senator John Cornyn of Texas. He said the legislation “does bring addition resources to budget constrained governments.”

Super. I’ll talk about that later.

Those resources would include a domestic trafficking victim’s fun, fucking for state and local law enforcement to track down sex offenders, and increased penalties for those convicted of related crimes. {via}

Ok, if you can get around the typos and Freudian slips there, the idea is to increase penalties for sex offenders in the form of fines. But think about punishing sex predators the same way we punish sex offenders. I think these are two distinctive types of people, committing different types of crimes. But we will punish them the same. How effective is this?
The fines will allow 3 things: a victims’ fund, more money to keep offenders locked up longer and more money back into law enforcement for policing methods (tasks forces/training, new hires, etc). My guess is the highest allocation will be in reverse order.
This is one of the many wonderful examples I study re: the way legislature and public dollars may or may not effect sex crimes and/or violent crime rates & the people committing them.  Also interesting that the person we see being cuffed here is a young female, this isn’t just another pop media mistake, is statistically correct for this county. Cutting off the supply should fix things, eh?

One of the things I look at:

… the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act. It’s proposed legislation by U.S. Senator John Cornyn of Texas. He said the legislation “does bring addition resources to budget constrained governments.”

Super. I’ll talk about that later.

Those resources would include a domestic trafficking victim’s fun, fucking for state and local law enforcement to track down sex offenders, and increased penalties for those convicted of related crimes. {via}

Ok, if you can get around the typos and Freudian slips there, the idea is to increase penalties for sex offenders in the form of fines. But think about punishing sex predators the same way we punish sex offenders. I think these are two distinctive types of people, committing different types of crimes. But we will punish them the same. How effective is this?

The fines will allow 3 things: a victims’ fund, more money to keep offenders locked up longer and more money back into law enforcement for policing methods (tasks forces/training, new hires, etc). My guess is the highest allocation will be in reverse order.

This is one of the many wonderful examples I study re: the way legislature and public dollars may or may not effect sex crimes and/or violent crime rates & the people committing them.  Also interesting that the person we see being cuffed here is a young female, this isn’t just another pop media mistake, is statistically correct for this county. Cutting off the supply should fix things, eh?

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  4. theboredboi said: It blows my mind how much money is going into the criminal justice system via paid time for officers and prisons, yet nothing is done to put the money in programs that would combat these offences in the first place.
  5. psydoctor8 posted this