Posts tagged bipolar

“To BD or not to BD: functional neuroimaging and the boundaries of bipolarity”




Bipolar disorders are major mood disorders defined by the presence of discrete episodes of depression and either mania, in bipolar I disorder, or hypomania, in bipolar II disorder. There is little contention that both are serious psychiatric conditions or that they are associated with substantial suffering, disability, risk of suicide and cost to the community. Recently, focus has shifted away from classic manic-depressive illness toward a ‘bipolar spectrum’ model, which allows for much softer presentations to be conceptualized as bipolarity, but the boundaries of this concept remain contentious. In this article, we will consider the contribution of neuroimaging to delineating the bipolar phenotype and differentiating it from similar disorders. [via]




Prediction: this model will be the case one day with psychopathy and other one card shark conditions, maybe not the next revision of the DSM…but eventually.

To BD or not to BD: functional neuroimaging and the boundaries of bipolarity

Bipolar disorders are major mood disorders defined by the presence of discrete episodes of depression and either mania, in bipolar I disorder, or hypomania, in bipolar II disorder. There is little contention that both are serious psychiatric conditions or that they are associated with substantial suffering, disability, risk of suicide and cost to the community. Recently, focus has shifted away from classic manic-depressive illness toward a ‘bipolar spectrum’ model, which allows for much softer presentations to be conceptualized as bipolarity, but the boundaries of this concept remain contentious. In this article, we will consider the contribution of neuroimaging to delineating the bipolar phenotype and differentiating it from similar disorders. [via]

Prediction: this model will be the case one day with psychopathy and other one card shark conditions, maybe not the next revision of the DSM…but eventually.

It’s tough to associate creativity with mental illness because obviously if you’re very ill, it gets in the way. … But one of the theories now is that the terrible swings of the mental illness – of bipolar depression – you get these manic highs, these euphorias, where the ideas just pour out of you. And you need to write them down. That’s followed by this dismal low period when maybe you’re a better editor. Maybe it’s easier for you to focus and refine those epiphanies into a perfect form. … The thinking is maybe the correlation exists because the swings of mental illness echo the natural swings of the creative process.

Jonah Lehrer, on the link between depression and creativity. [complete interview here] (via nprfreshair)

Ok, by “one of the theories now" I assume he means the one published back in 2006.  NYC Psychopharmacologist, Ronald Fieve, MD  specializes in depressive disorders, namely bipolar - and wrote all about enhancing the lows and highs in Bipolar II. Since the 70’s, many of his patients have been creative types: writers, directors, actors, fashion designers…etc. 

Using neuroscience to identify bipolar disorder

Researchers are getting closer to identifying the genes that cause bipolar disorder. They’re using brain imaging to track the illness in a person’s neural pathways. And they’re zeroing in on triggers that might cause it to flare up.

…and regarding kids with ADHD which is thought to be often misdiagnosed as early signs of bipolar:

The two conditions are frequently confused, especially in children, and that can lead to serious mistakes in prescribing medication, she said. The stimulants used to treat ADHD can drive mania to frightening heights in someone with bipolar.

 Advances in locating pathways/genes may spur clinical trials of more effective treatments, but also non-psyhopharmacological therapeutic treatments.

Relax: You're not bipolar (reliability and validity in research)

"To claim the wrong diagnosis (whether over or under), we must claim validity. We must know whether or not the diagnosis is valid, before we can tell whether it is being over or underdiagnosed. We need to start with valid diagnoses of bipolar disorder, and then assess past clinician’s diagnoses to see whether they were right - not the other way around, as was done in the Brown study (and indeed in most studies claiming overdiagnosis).

Here is proof of underdiagnosis: a validly diagnosed bipolar sample would have been diagnosed, in part, as having other conditions by past clinicians.  Here is proof of overdiagnosis: a validly diagnosed bipolar sample would have been diagnosed, almost always, as having bipolar disorder by past clinicians, and validly diagnosed other conditions (like schizophrenia or unipolar depression) would have been diagnosed, in part, as having bipolar disorder by past clinicians.

That is the way to do it: yet no such study has ever been done that shows overdiagnosis of bipolar disorder. In contrast, a few such studies have been conducted and shown underdiagnosis of bipolar disorder, and overdiagnosis of schizophrenia, unipolar depression, or ADHD.”