Posts tagged juvenile justice

Juvenile Arrest Data Quality in New York State’s Incident Based Reporting System, Final Report 

When an IBR (Incident-Based Reporting) participating agency closes a reported incident with an arrest of a juvenile, a release status is reported for each arrestee. The release status provides information on what type of police action was taken against the arrestee after he/she was identified as the offender. 

New York State IBR has three release statuses: Diverted to Counseling/Treatment Program, Handled within the Department, and Referred to Criminal Court, Juvenile/Family Court or Probation Intake.  

The most recent info released in 2011 gives just an idea of what the counseling or treatment program’s load was like. Also, 184 of these were categorized as “violent crimes”, with no info on the sentence breakdown.

Lawyers for Juvenile Lifers Convicted of Murder Urge Supreme Court to Overturn Sentences

Lawyers for two prisoners sentenced to life in prison for murders committed when they were age 14 are urging the U.S. Supreme Court to accept their cases and strike down their sentences as unconstitutional.

The lawyers want the Supreme Court to extend its Graham v. Florida decision that held unconstitutional life sentences for juveniles who were convicted of crimes other than murder, the New York Times reports. The lawyers say life sentences without parole should be banned for all offenders who were 13 and 14 when they committed their crimes. VIA

This is a big deal since it will force us to determine what to do with juvenile offenders when we can’t just lock them away forever. Perhaps returning to the original purpose of juvenile courts over 100 years ago, which was to provide rehabilitation and guidance will be part of the solution. Putting them in prison for life is cruel and unusual punishment based on lack of cognitive development, maturity and/or deficiencies (which leans to culpably). Once a process is in place for juveniles, maybe it will be one that can extend and be adjusted for adults as well…years down the road.

danielbeekman:

BRONX’S NOTORIOUS SPOFFORD JUVENILE DETENTION CENTER FINALLY SHUT DOWN
BY DANIEL BEEKMAN (NYDN) 
Read more…

Semi-encouraging and glad to read this. Between the only two mentioned possibilities of reopening it as a “school or social services center - something positive for Hunts Point” or a “full-fledged prison for youth offenders” ….which would the city most benefit from?  
Karen Franklin, Ph.D. writes  in a recent post, “The most thorough study to date, just released by The U.S. Department of Justice, brings lots of good news about criminal desistance among serious adolescent offenders. “

"The most important finding is that even adolescents who have committed serious offenses are not necessarily on track for adult criminal careers. Only a small proportion of the offenders studied continued to offend at a high level throughout the followup period. The other critical finding was that incarceration is for the most part unnecessary and ineffective:
Longer stays in juvenile facilities did not reduce reoffending; institutional placement even raised offending levels in those with the lowest level of offending.
Instead, the study found, interventions that combined community-based supervision and substance abuse treatment helped youthful offenders stay in school, get jobs, and avoid further offending.”

Obviously important to consider when deciding what to do with the facility, and hopefully advocates are aware of this study to use against a money strapped city who may see the prison as a short sighted solution —after elections are over (producing long term problems) and source of income. This is a chance to rebuild a piece of the juvenile justice system using methods shown to help, not hurt.

danielbeekman:

BRONX’S NOTORIOUS SPOFFORD JUVENILE DETENTION CENTER FINALLY SHUT DOWN

BY DANIEL BEEKMAN (NYDN) 

Read more…

Semi-encouraging and glad to read this. Between the only two mentioned possibilities of reopening it as a “school or social services center - something positive for Hunts Point” or a “full-fledged prison for youth offenders” ….which would the city most benefit from?  

Karen Franklin, Ph.D. writes  in a recent post, “The most thorough study to date, just released by The U.S. Department of Justice, brings lots of good news about criminal desistance among serious adolescent offenders. “

"The most important finding is that even adolescents who have committed serious offenses are not necessarily on track for adult criminal careers. Only a small proportion of the offenders studied continued to offend at a high level throughout the followup period. 

The other critical finding was that incarceration is for the most part unnecessary and ineffective:

Longer stays in juvenile facilities did not reduce reoffending; institutional placement even raised offending levels in those with the lowest level of offending.

Instead, the study found, interventions that combined community-based supervision and substance abuse treatment helped youthful offenders stay in school, get jobs, and avoid further offending.”

Obviously important to consider when deciding what to do with the facility, and hopefully advocates are aware of this study to use against a money strapped city who may see the prison as a short sighted solution —after elections are over (producing long term problems) and source of income. This is a chance to rebuild a piece of the juvenile justice system using methods shown to help, not hurt.

May 17th: “the United States Supreme Court ruled that the Constitution does not permit a juvenile offender to be sentenced to life in prison without parole for a non-homicide crime. The ruling creates a new categorical rule that invalidates Joe Sullivan’s sentence to life in prison without parole for a non-homicide crime at age 13.”

May 17th: “the United States Supreme Court ruled that the Constitution does not permit a juvenile offender to be sentenced to life in prison without parole for a non-homicide crime. The ruling creates a new categorical rule that invalidates Joe Sullivan’s sentence to life in prison without parole for a non-homicide crime at age 13.”

Re: the constitutionality of Life sentencing for Juveniles.

"…research on adolescent brain and behavioral development has provided additional support for Justice Kennedy’s observations. There is now a consensus among neuroscientists, for example, that brain regions and systems responsible for foresight, self-regulation, risk assessment and responsiveness to social influences continue to mature into young adulthood. This evidence that adolescents are psychologically and neurologically less mature than adults should be important in deciding how to punish their criminal acts.

…even psychological experts are unable to distinguish between the young person whose crime reflects transient immaturity and the rare juvenile offender who may deserve the harsh sentence of life without parole. If experts can’t reliably make this determination, then it seems unlikely that juries and judges would be able to do much better.”

More on:11yo Charged With Murder May Be Tried as Adult

I’ve post about this before, here is the parent’s interview.

photographyprison:

Cambodia’s Child Prisoners by Mark Writtle

click thru.  watch the sideshow.

i dont like to see my research topic in the headlines

15 yr old girl murders a 9 yr old “to see what it felt like”.