Posts tagged policy

Sympathy for the Devils: Should Sex Offenders Have More Rights or None at All?
Aside from the disdain for this type of question when so many factors are involved precluding it from being an all or nothing situation, it’s worth the read if you’re interested in how at least one state who is the most compliant in sex offender registry and notification act also has the one of the highest recidivism rates…or would like to consider how the registry punishes sex offenders the same as sex predators. Or if you want to know the kinda stuff related to what I’m researching…. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Sympathy for the Devils: Should Sex Offenders Have More Rights or None at All?

Aside from the disdain for this type of question when so many factors are involved precluding it from being an all or nothing situation, it’s worth the read if you’re interested in how at least one state who is the most compliant in sex offender registry and notification act also has the one of the highest recidivism rates…or would like to consider how the registry punishes sex offenders the same as sex predators. Or if you want to know the kinda stuff related to what I’m researching…. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

"Paved with Good Intentions: Sentencing Alternatives from Neuroscience and the Policy of Problem-Solving Courts"

Abstract:      
Advances in basic and clinical neuroscience will soon present novel options for prediction, treatment, and prevention of antisocial behavior, particularly drug addiction. These hard-won advances have significant potential to improve public health and safety and increase efficiency in delivery of treatment and rehabilitation. Such therapies will undoubtedly find a large portion of their target population in the criminal justice system as long as drug possession remains criminalized.

Improvements, however, are not without risks. The risks stem not only from the safety and side effect profile of such treatments, but also their insertion into a specialized criminal justice and sentencing system of “problem-solving courts” that may be overburdened, overpoliticized, undertheorized, and lacking sufficient checks and balances on institutional competency. While offering substantial therapeutic benefits, such developments might also short-circuit a critical policy discussion about the nature of drug use and its criminalization. 

 - Emily R. Murphy, Standford Law School  [via]

The ever-growing sex offender registry...a case of over reaching

 Have states gone too far in categorizing criminals as sex offenders? Already, the number of registered sex offenders is growing quickly, and it will only keep rising as more states comply with the federal Adam Walsh Act. That law requires all states to make false imprisonment a sex offense, as Georgia and Wisconsin already do, by July. The Adam Walsh Act also requires the states to post more information about sex offenders on their registries, such as their work addresses. So far, only Ohio has fully complied with the law.

In Wisconsin, Supreme Court Justice Annette Kingsland Ziegler’s opinion noted that 41 states have laws requiring kidnappers and other criminals who may not have committed sex crimes to register as sex offenders. In most instances, kidnapping and false imprisonment of a minor are deemed by state law to be crimes that have a “nexus” to sexual offenses because they involve children or teenagers.”

Further: Arizona parents who want to find out whether a suspicious e-mail has been sent by a registered sex offender now can check the sender’s e-mail address against the state’s database of convicted molesters.
Utah residents can sign up for e-mail alerts to notify them when a sex offender moves into their neighborhood.
Wisconsin’s online registry provides maps to let users know exactly where the closest sex offender lives.
And in Texas, the state’s sex offender registry — which includes more than 54,000 people — now features information ranging from offenders’ work addresses to their nicknames and even shoe sizes.  
 All 50 states have publicly searchable sex offender registries, which are accessible through a national database kept by the U.S. Justice Department, a Web site that averages 2.3 million page views a day.” (via)

Scientists using psychedelics as "existential medicine"

simloovoo:

via wildcat

"Scientists are taking a new look at hallucinogens, which became taboo among regulators after enthusiasts like Timothy Leary promoted them in the 1960s with the slogan “Turn on, tune in, drop out.” Now, using rigorous protocols and safeguards, scientists have won permission to study once again the drugs’ potential for treating mental problems and illuminating the nature of consciousness."

Special Seminar: Interested? I’ll be there.

From the Division of Law, Ethics, and Psychiatry- Columbia University Medical Center

Topic: Sex Offender Residence Restrictions: Findings from Survey and Spatial Analyses

Where: New York State Psychiatric Institute

what:  … focuses broadly on establishing empirical evidence for use in sex offender policy and sexual violence prevention. ….sex offender treatment, civil commitment, and risk for recidivism. …. by a team of researchers at John Jay who are investigating the causes and contexts of sexual abuse in the Catholic Church.

More details: ask me.

Meanwhile, back at the hall of justice-

New York State Assembly Bill A03856

…would stop police and prosecutors from using possession of condoms as evidence that people engaged - or intended to engage - in prostitution is now on the floor of the New York State Assembly. Currently, police and courts can use the fact that a person has or is carrying condoms to prove that they are engaging in criminal activity. Sex workers report that they are more likely to be arrested if they carry condoms, and sex work venues are more likely to be raided if there are condoms on the premises. Police officers regularly confiscate condoms from people they allege are engaged in prostitution to use as evidence against them at trial. As a result people are hesitant to carry condoms to protect themselves and others, for fear that it will lead to arrest or be held against them in court. Sound public health policy would encourage condom use by eliminating the fear that carrying a condom will be used against you by police or in a court of law. Go here to see what you can do.